Using Qualtrics for Usability Testing

At the marvelously helpful [email protected] event I was at yesterday, I learned about a great way to use survey software (Qualtrics) for usability testing. Since we have the same software here at Baruch College, I spent part of today setting up a few sandbox surveys so that I could try out different question types and get a sense of how survey data would be recorded and displayed. I’ve found three question types so far that look like they’ll be useful. All of them involved uploading screenshots to be part of the question.

Question Type: Heat Maps

Looking at a screenshot, the user gets to click somewhere on the screen in response to some question posed in the survey. The data then gets recorded in a heat map of click data; if you mouse over different parts of the heat map report, you can see how many clicks were done in that one spot. Another way you can set up the screenshot is to predefine regions that you want to name so that the heat map report not only offers the traditional heat map display but also a table below showing all the regions you defined and how many clicked in one of those special regions.

Question Type: Hot Spots

As with the heat map question type, the hot spot question presents the user with a screenshot to click on. But this type of question requires that the person setting up the survey predefine regions on the screenshot. When the test participant is viewing the screenshot, they are are again being asked to click somewhere based on the question being posed. The survey designer can either make those predefined regions have borders that are visible only on mouse over or that are always visible. By making the region borders visible to the test participant, you can draw the participant’s eye to the choices you want him/her to focus on.

Question Type: Multiple Choice

Although multiple choice questions are the most lowly of question types here–no razzle dazzle–it wasn’t until today that I realized how easy it is to upload an image (such as a screenshot) to be part of the answer choice. This seems like a great way to present 2 or more design ideas you are toying with.

Many Uses for a Survey

As a one-person UX group at my library, I find running tests a challenge sometimes if I can’t find a colleague or two to rope into lending a hand with the test. Now I feel like I’ve got a new option for getting feedback, one that can be used in conjunction with a formal usability test or that can be used in lots of different ways:

  • Load the survey in the browser of a tablet and go up to students in the library, the cafeteria, etc. and ask for quick feedback\
  • Bring up the survey at the reference desk at the close of a reference interaction when it seems like the student might be open to helping us out for a minute or two
  • Distribute the survey link through various communication channels we’ve got (library home page, email blast to all students, on a flyer, etc.)

Sample Survey

I made a sample survey here in Qualtrics that you can try out. It’s designed to show off some of the features of questions in Qualtrics, not to answer any real usability questions we currently have here at Baruch. At the close of the session, I set it up so that it offers you a summary of your response (only I can see all the responses aggregated together in a report. It’s likely that when I use Qualtrics surveys for usability, I’ll set them up so they end either by looping back to the first question (useful when I’m going up to people with my iPad in hand and survey loaded in the browser) or by giving them some thank you message. If I get enough responses in this sample survey, I’ll write a new post to show what the report for the survey looks like. In the meanwhile, I’d be interested in hearing from anyone that is already using Qualtrics for usability testing or another survey tool.

2 thoughts on “Using Qualtrics for Usability Testing

Comments are closed.